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4 Lessons from FOMC Yesterday

On June 15th, yesterday afternoon, the Federal Reserve released the Federal Open Market Committee’s (FOMC) latest Summary of Economic Projections, coupled with their corresponding statement. They revealed that the FOMC had decided to raise the Federal Funds Rate by a whopping 75 basis points (bps), to a range between 1.5-1.75%; such a hike has not been seen since 1994. Upon this news, and ostensibly in response to Federal Reserve Chair Jerome Powell’s press conference afterwards, financial markets saw a great deal of volatility. The US Dollar Index (DXY) made gains before closing lower at 104.66, while the Dow Jones oscillated between 30,000 and 31,000 before closing slightly higher. Today DXY continues to sink lower as the Dow abandons yesterday’s gains, falling over 800 points intraday, below 30,000. With this context in mind, let’s unpack this as we learn 4 lessons from FOMC yesterday.

1) The Fed is Becoming Increasingly Hawkish

The 75 bps rate hike decision was somewhat shocking. Though an increasing number of analysts began predicting it earlier this week (with speculation about a supposed leak occurring), such an aggressive measure is rare by contemporary standards. Powell made it clear the bold decision was taken in response to May’s hotter-than-expected inflation data, a disturbing 1% CPI increase month-over-month, or 8.6% year-over-year. Though this had not been the FOMC’s intention prior to this information, Powell emphasized that they are willing to roll with the punches and are open to further aggressive measures so long as inflation remains a serious threat.

While he did convey that they will be planning each hike on a case-by-case basis contingent upon inflation reports, he seemed to be signaling that the Fed’s responsibility for price stability must temporarily take precedent over currently maximizing employment, that it might be maximized long-term. This reflects the tone of the hawkish FOMC statement as well, factoring into the aforementioned economic projections, which anticipate increased unemployment, slower growth, and at least a 3% Federal Funds Rate by the end of 2022. While invariably negative news for the stock market, this is perhaps more ambiguous for USD than it appears at face-value, since a seemingly positive hawkish agenda may be undercut by worsening economic expectations.

2) Powell is Unpredictable (Even to Himself)

A generous interpretation of Powell’s decision and rationale is that he reacts swiftly to the latest information. A more cynical interpretation, which some of the questions at the press conference reflected, is that he is fickle and erratic, indicating one set of monetary policy plans before scrapping them for new ones. After all, today’s hawkish FOMC Chairman is nearly unrecognizable from the COVID-era Powell who was fixated on economic stimulus and near-zero interest rates.

However, to Powell’s credit, he is rather self-aware on this matter. He was transparent yesterday about the fact that he is entirely unsure to what extent each rate hike will cool the overheated US economy, particularly in light of pervasive supply chain issues and externalities due to the invasion of Ukraine. These are holistically unusual circumstances, and the FOMC is confined to conducting an ongoing sequence of interest rate experiments to eventually establish an inflation solution. Though honest, this degree of transparency has likely not helped the public or markets gain trust in the Federal Reserve, and thus may have contributed to today’s securities selloffs.

3) Leave Room for Baffling Market Reactions

Upon reading the statement and watching the press conference, the Fed’s intentions left little room for interpretation in my eyes, striking me as hawkish in a clear-cut fashion. While Powell did leave some wiggle room for less aggressive responses if future CPI reports reflect inflation slowing down, he made it quite clear that more 75 bps hikes are on the table, even likely. Taken altogether, all the information provided yesterday appeared overwhelmingly bullish for USD, and bearish for stocks. While yesterday saw another bout of odd buying pressure for stocks upon the rate hike news, today’s decline is unfortunately a more understandable return to form.

However, DXY is down over 1% today intraday as USD plummets in value against other currencies. Despite today’s news on higher-than-expected US unemployment claims, as well as worsening economic conditions according to the Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia, this USD outcome has been surprising. Although economic expectations in the US are becoming gradually bleaker as recession fears grow, I had imagined that demand for USD due to huge rate hikes and persistent inflation would have outweighed selling pressure. While I am still anticipating this to be the case, it is helpful to remember that there is no certainty in the markets, and every bullish or bearish signal must be taken with more than a grain of salt.

4) Technical Analysis Still Matters

One factor that likely aided selling pressure for USD was how much buying pressure it had encountered in the days leading up to FOMC, perhaps in anticipation of the suspected 75 bps hike. This bullish momentum reflected in USD pairs, many cases of which led price action to a key level of support or resistance. Touching these levels, in conjunction with how overbought USD was purely from the standpoint of various technical indicators such as the Relative Strength Index and Keltner Channels, was a good recipe for price action reversing course.

This FOMC news is thus a great case study in (seemingly) straightforward fundamentals not exempting traders from having to conduct technical analysis. Even if foreign exchange markets favor USD bulls in the long run, bullish momentum will still almost certainly pause here and there while bears exhaust themselves. If this is the case, such a pause taking place at the intersection between key support/resistance levels and big central bank news was the perfect point to do so.

Key Takeaways

This morning saw demand for USD rapidly pick up steam as US inflation data came in hotter than expected. Month-over-month CPI had been forecast to rise by 0.7% in May; at 8:30 am Eastern Time, the Bureau of Labor Statistics revealed that it had increased by 1%, or 8.6% year-over-year, a forty-year high. Likewise, Core CPI (which excludes food and energy prices) was forecast to rise by 0.5% month-over-month, instead hitting 0.6%. On this news, the DXY is up 0.8% and has risen over the 104 level intraday, as EURUSD is down 1% and the S&P 500 is down nearly 3%. With this context in mind, let’s discuss 3 ways to capitalize on inflation now.

Trade Major Pairs

3 Ways to Capitalize on Inflation Now

This CPI news is a huge fundamental catalyst for USD pairs since it verifies that the US economy is indeed still overheating, validating further interest rate hikes by the Federal Reserve. This is very bullish for USD, which makes buying the USD against other currencies even more appealing. If traders are searching for optimal USD pairs to take positions in, a good place to start is by locating pairs where analysis leans in USD’s favor to the greatest degree possible.

Some such options include a) shorting GBPUSD and EURUSD, which receive -7 (‘strong sell’) and -5 (‘sell’) signals, respectively, from the EdgeFinder, and b) going long on USDJPY, which receives a 4 (‘buy’) EdgeFinder signal. Because USD experienced so much buying pressure this morning, conservative traders may want to find an opportune point of entry by conducting technical analysis, e.g., waiting for a pullback and retest of key support/resistance.

Buy XAUUSD

3 Ways to Capitalize on Inflation Now

Though admittedly a controversial opinion, I am waiting for an optimal point of entry to purchase gold against USD. XAUUSD experienced quite the selloff this morning before a startling recovery, jumping from a low of 1825 to hovering around 1855 at the time of writing this. This jump was seemingly prompted by finding support around the 1830 level, a clear zone of support on a 1-hour timeframe.

I interpret fundamentals being bullish for XAUUSD due to demand for the precious metal in several different industries and its historical status as a safe haven investment in times of economic crisis. There have been periods where gold’s rise in value does not correlate with USD depreciating in value, which is helpful to consider in cases like these. According to the latest COT data, institutional traders are similarly long on both USD (76%) and gold (73.56%). I am planning to purchase XAUUSD if price action retests the trendline depicted on the 1-day timeframe above, though this opportunity may not come if demand continues to grow quickly.

Invest in the Stock Market

3 Ways to Capitalize on Inflation Now

Though it may seem strange in the face of persisting hyperinflation and potential for recession, economic downturns and stock selloffs do present myriad buying opportunities for long-term investors. If you are not planning on retiring for decades, you can utilize dips in the stock market and indices to build wealth over time, assuming you are willing to sacrifice immediate results. For example, when the Dow plummets over 600 points like it has today, investors can seize these events as opportunities for cheap purchases that will yield returns years down the road.

If your investment portfolio keeps crashing in the meantime, this does not have to be discouraging since they are merely unrealized losses; they will likely grow in value through the decades if you are invested in index ETFs and other trustworthy funds. Any further selloffs present even more opportunities for regular, small purchases. (However, investing in individual stocks is a completely different story, and I personally believe that even the most skilled retail investors are not sufficiently equipped to handle the inherent risks involved.)

Key Takeaways

Why I Day Traded USDCHF

Price action for USD pairs was fascinating today as the DXY reflected bearish momentum that saw a low of nearly 102.15 intraday. This selloff was stopped at approximately 8:30 a.m. Eastern Time when eager buyers sent it soaring, eventually over the 103.3 level. Several factors were at play here, including important European Central Bank news and expectations for new US CPI data tomorrow. I took this opportunity to trade USDCHF this morning; it went well, and I entered and exited the trade in under an hour. Below I explore my process, and why I day traded USDCHF.

Fundamental Analysis

In many ways, the fundamentals favor CHF: Q1 GDP growth in Switzerland was positive unlike for the US, unemployment is 1.5% lower than in the US, and year-over-year inflation is gradually climbing. However, the Swiss National Bank currently has its key interest rate at -0.75%, compared to the Federal Reserve’s 1%, which involved a 50 basis point rate hike. On top of this, both CHF and USD are historically safe haven assets, and USD has encountered recent bearish data and increased chances at volatility due to upcoming US CPI data (perhaps indirectly through today’s ECB announcements as well). Thus, I decided I felt comfortable enough to go long on USDCHF as a day trade, but not confident enough to sit in it for too long.

Technical Analysis

I felt that there were enough technical indications here to warrant a brief long position. On the 1-hour timeframe, the price moved rapidly outside the Keltner Channel walls, and met significant support in two places: the 0.972 zone and the trendline pictured. I interpreted this bearish candlestick as a hasty reaction to meeting resistance around 0.98 (a reaction that could be short lived in light of potential for USD volatility). Thus, I entered at the 0.973 level, and took profit just above the 0.978 level, since I was not confident it could break through 0.98 resistance.

Sentiment Analysis

Sentiment analysis also made me feel comfortable entering the position. According to A1 Trading’s EdgeFinder, recent COT data reveals 76% of institutional traders going long on USD, whereas just over 10% are going long on CHF. In contrast, less than 1/3 of retail traders are long on this pair. These are all incredibly bullish signs for USDCHF, making me feel confident in my purchase, especially as Switzerland grapples with neighboring eurozone issues and with today’s arguably banal ECB decision. However, given my aforementioned uncertainties about the pair’s fundamentals and mutual safe haven status, I still planned on an early exit.

Key Takeaways

3 Lies Traders Should Avoid Today

One of the things that makes retail trading unique as a pastime, or even a career, is the degree of honesty and self-reflection it requires. There are many jobs that offer some consistent semblance of leeway when it comes to making mistakes and honing a skill set, but trading is not one of them. No trader can negotiate a raise with the markets or hope for the markets to recognize their hard work; if anyone is not careful with their expectations and risk management, even just one losing trade can be catastrophic. Hence, why truthfulness matters in the world of retail trading: it often spells the difference between passive income and financial ruin. With that in mind, let’s explore 3 lies traders should avoid today.

“My strategy doesn’t need stop losses”

Regardless of a trader’s win rate, every trustworthy strategy incorporates stop losses to some meaningful degree. This is because it is as near certain as statistically possible that unmitigated risk in trading will eventually have terrible consequences. Even if a strategy somehow achieved a win rate over 95% with consistent incremental gains, unchecked risk would still be present in every trade, resulting in a handful of losses that could easily erase all prior profits in a fraction of the time (I know this from personal experience). Stop losses, especially trailing ones, are thus an indispensable tool for traders when it comes to safeguarding against inevitable losses and making their wins count in the long run.

“I will compound my account so fast”

Building a large trading account is a long, gradual process that requires plenty of discipline and patience. Because of this, if a retail trader approaches entering and exiting positions through the lens of a get-rich-quick scheme, they are bound to become disappointed and discouraged, and likely lose money along the way due to over-leveraging and impulsive trading. Thus, it is important for traders to generate realistic expectations for themselves, and not take success for granted. Some ways to practice this include a) thoroughly backtesting any strategies of choice, b) avoiding trading out of financial desperation, and c) recognizing that your value as a person has nothing to do with your account’s performance.

“Fundamentals don’t really matter”

Technical analysis is a wonderful tool for every trader to have equipped, and there are myriad technical indicators worth exploring and adding to any strategy. Likewise, sentiment analysis is valuable as well, since anticipating buying and selling pressure is at the heart of trading as a discipline. However, even with these two crucial forms of analysis at our disposal, it must never be taken for granted that traders are buying and selling real securities.

In a new age of gamification and excessive speculation fueling price action volatility in the markets, it can become easy to believe, even subconsciously, that trading is reducible to a worldwide chart-reading game. Therefore, it’s possible for many traders to miss out on significant fundamental catalysts and opportune points of entry and exit, because it is easy to forget that we are trading in real markets that are shaped by concrete circumstances and events in our world. Thus, whether a trader is buying or selling stocks, currency pairs, or bonds, it is always wise to conduct fundamental analysis, whether that be monitoring macroeconomic data, business fundamentals, or other variables.

Key Takeaways

In trading, money is the only tool that we use to make money. If prices go high after buying one, we become really happy. But the scenario gets completely opposite when we lose 5 in a row. We develop the fear that the trading account will be blown up soon. 

Trading is a very practical thing yet it brings tremendous excitement and joy for us. But it should not capture one’s emotion and logical mindset. Emotions should not make you trade. You should do it with logic and expertise. Still, there is always the fear of missing out. It’s high time to get ways for ‘how to overcome your trading fear’.  

This fear for a longer span of time not only leaves a negative effect on your trading decisions but also affects your overall mental health. There are some ways that expert traders follow to overcome fear and emotion. Professionals who can control their fear and emotion are prone to succeed most times. How have they achieved this mental robustness? Let’s explore-   

Trading Fear
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How to overcome your trading fear easily?- A step-by-step approach

1. Craft a Positive & Winning Performance

You must agree that successful trading is all about 90% mindset and 10% skills. After placing an order, if you find that you are breathing quickly or feeling negative, it’s sure that you are expecting something negative. When your mind is having a negative expectation, it can block your logical thinking ability. Anxiousness can let you make many common mistakes. 

Does negative thinking really matter? After researching well and taking suggestions from others yet you are anxious, there is a high possibility that you will get a negative outcome. In order to win, at the first move, you have to eliminate this negative attitude and turn that into a winning expectation. You should have the trust that you can trade successfully. 

Having negative outcomes in a row often breaks the confidence level of traders. In such a situation, keeping the mind cool is the first virtue that you have to achieve. You should remember your success and its way. You will get a way to win along with getting some vigor and confidence back. 

2. Try to learn something new in trading

Suppose, the situation is not going well for you. What’s you do in such an anxious situation? In such a situation, making perfect trading decisions is hard as you cannot logically analyze everything. This time can be spent on learning new things about trading. A new strategy of trading is always fun and can make you profitable in the future. 

There is no fixed time to learn new things in trading. Whenever you get time or make time, you can learn interesting trading things such as Iron condors, Credit Spreads operate, RSI, MACD indicators, and so on. 

There are various online forex day trading courses that you can join to master the genre. You will be more confident when you will gain new skills and know more about the ups and downs of trading. 

3. Conduct in-depth market research 

It’s important to research the market very well in order to understand the patterns of trades. If you don’t know what to do next, it can emotionally burden you. Even if you have placed an order yet you have some doubts. Take a step back and research the topics you want to know. Regular practice and study are important when it comes to mastering the art and science of trading. If you cannot manage the best guide for yourself, join a leading online trading academy to get expert help and training facilities. 

You can prepare a list of things that you find hard to understand and heard the first time. After that, you need to pick topics that you need to learn first based on your trading requirements. The trading list should be updated rather than increased on a regular basis and in a systematic way. Trading is a vast field and mastering that within a year is not possible. You have to go slow and steady for long or for your entire trading career. Learning has really no end in the trading field. 

4. Enable paper trade until you master

While learning new topics on a regular basis, you will get new strategies on your own. You will want to apply your newly developed strategies. But there will be some doubts for sure. These doubts can lead you towards trading fears and you can get controlled by your emotions. 

So, whenever you craft a new strategy and want to deploy that or wish to use a new indicator, you can enable paper trade before deploying it in real. Yes, paper trading is not perfect by many means but here you will definitely get a controlled environment. The controlled environment will help you in learning how to enable comfortable envelope-pushing with trades without risking your capital. 

5. Analyze 5 completely new charts

When it comes to how to overcome your trading fear after losing in a row, experts suggest analyzing new charts to get insights. It’s common for many traders to get emotionally attached to the stock, ETF, or any product they trade on. They spend many hours nurturing them and keeping hope in them. Keeping hope in everything can result in something counterproductive. So, it’s always better to search 5 new charts of companies where you do not that that much attachment. 

After finalizing the list of charts, you should analyze each one deeply and prepare reasons to buy or sell them. In this way, you will be able to develop a neutral mindset. Such a practice will help you evaluate a position without having any emotional attachment. When there is a less emotional attachment, there is less trade fear and you can think more clearly. 

These are 5 steps that successful traders always follow to overcome trading fear. So, if you too are concerned about how to overcome your trading fear easily, following these steps will be a great help for you. 

Concluding to how to overcome your trading fear


Following these steps is easy and does not require any additional effort. These 5 steps are actually a system process that not only trains your mind but also helps you in having new skills. Gaining new skills is challenging yet you have to do it as the trading market is really complex. Effective and consistent effort on a regular basis can turn you into a successful trader. These steps are there to make you consistent and wise. 

 

Being in the 5% club means making consistent gains on your forex account. This is done by building an account through small and steady gains and building it at a rate in which you can control it. In this article, we will share a few attributes of profitable forex traders which we believe are critical to their success.

Unfortunately, 90-95% of forex traders fail to ever make it to a point where their winning trades outweigh their losing ones. Often times, the traders who fail to make it to the 5% club are those who expect to quickly make money through trading or attempt to flip accounts in a short period of time. Traders with this mindset will usually lose money quickly and burn out fast.

5 Reasons why Traders Fail: Tips from an Experienced Trader!

Profitable Forex Traders are Consistent

Plan your trade, trade your plan.

The first step to being successful in trading is creating a profitable strategy. This is achieved by spending significant time backtesting and researching forex trading strategies. The next step, which is often harder for traders, is to actually follow through with that plan. In stressful times traders have a tendency to change their approach to avoid losing a trade. This usually leaves traders in a worse situation than they would be in if they had stuck with their original plan. Make sure you've backtest your strategy and have the confidence to stick with it!

Download our FREE trading plan template here.

Profitable Forex Traders

Trading Success Has To Be Earned

Becoming a profitable trader won't happen overnight. Trading successfully requires patience, consistency, and grit. There is no fast pass to success in trading. Trading requires lots of backtesting and strategizing to develop a plan which works for you. Your success in trading is a personal journey that only you can earn. Trading mentors can guide you on the path to success but in the end you are responsible for doing the work.

Profitable Forex Traders Love What They Do

If your only interest in trading forex is to make money, you probably won't make it too long before you burn out. As we mentioned previously, becoming a successful trader takes grit. You will likely lose many trades before you'll win some. For some traders, it takes years before they're consistently making more than they are losing. To be able to make it through these harder times you have to be motivated by something other than monetary success, because it won't always be there. You have to truly love trading and love the process.

A trade closed at breakeven is one that is neither a winner nor a loser. It closes at a particular price where profit and losses both equal to zero, or close enough.

The beauty of breakeven trades is that, although you may not increase your account with them, they enable you to protect your capital, which is crucial when being a part of this game.

Let's discuss the two types of regular breakeven trades and the psychology behind them.

Scenario 1

The above scenario usually unfolds through wild swings of price action and unpredictable market events, and it's a smart move to protect your capital and exit at breakeven.

However, traders often end up with breakeven trades for the wrong reasons, usually encounter fear and see a positive trade turn negative.

Scenario 2

You've been in a trade that hasn't been going well, and you are finally starting to see price creep back towards your entry level. Although it's never really a good idea to let losing trades run, doing so can work to our advantage.

As the saying says, "cut losses short, let profits run", and of course no one wants to close out on a trade in a loss, but sometimes it's the better thing to do; it gives you more time and energy to focus on other potential setups, instead of dreading the losing trade you're in right now.

Hope can lead a trader to hold a losing trade which they should have exited a long time ago. Closing a trade at breakeven is the best that you can do, and that doing so can save you from taking on more significant losses than necessary.

But obviously, no one knows exactly what will happen, so it's not like we can "choose" which scenario we want to make a reality. It's way easier said than done, but the message I'm trying to portray here, is that it's okay to close out early on a trade that is not moving in your favour.

It's essential to keep track of your breakeven trades; they reveal a lot about how you keep yourself together in times of extreme stress.

Next time you close at breakeven, take a step back and ask yourself what that zero in the P/L column means. Did you execute your trade according to plan, and the market just didn’t go your way? Or were you overcome by fear, greed, or hope?

Charge it towards your experience, make the adjustment to your forex trading plans, and move forward.

A key component of being successful in the trading field is by maintaining consistent long-term results. This article is to draw your attention to some of the more nuanced aspects of successful trading that you may or may not have been paying attention to, which can essentially make or break your account.

Though I can't promise you success, if you read and implement the three points discussed below, you should see some improvement in your trading results.

1) NOT Trading is a Part of the Game

To anyone not aware of the power of staying on the sideline, this is one of the easiest ways to maintain consistency in trading. Immediately it sounds counter-intuitive, but it works.

To know when not to trade, you need to know when to trade. This would involve mastering an effective trading strategy such as price action trading, market structure trading, news trading, or preferably a combination of all three.

By having a good mixture of confluences in your trade setups, you will know your trading edge and when to trade. When you see a setup without a good mixture of confluences, then you'll know to not enter.

An example of this would be if you see a mixture of price action sell signals on Gold, such as a descending triangle pattern on the daily timeframe, maybe a rising wedge on the H4 timeframe, or anything else pointing towards a sell on Gold from a technical aspect. However, maybe the Fed just came out and announced that inflation is on the rise in the US, and fundamentally the USD is not performing too well. This mixture of buy and sell signals could make you step back and stay on the sidelines to see what happens next.

Always remember that by not trading, you are not losing money. Obviously, the long-term goal is to make a fantastic ROI, so eventually, we will have to enter some trades. However, stepping back for a day, or maybe even a week, isn't a bad idea. It allows you to see what's going on and how market prices are reacting to specific events.

2) What is the Long-Term Goal?

You need to work out what you want from this, and how you will realistically achieve this goal. For example, my goal in trading is to make a 60-100% ROI per year. Looking back at my past three years of trading, I've noticed my winning months average out to about 6-10% ROI per month swing trading and barely paying much attention to my positions. Just simply finding amazing setups and letting them run until either SL or TP, while trailing stops when in profit.

Making 60-100% per year is much better than making 170% in February, then losing it all in March. Your chances of becoming successful in this field are improved simply by taking a part-time view on your trading, rather than wanting to be a full-time trader straight away.

3) Develop Your Trading Habits

You need to develop a consistent trading routine that is devoid of gambling-like behaviour. By becoming organised and disciplined, you'll develop a routine that reinforces positive habits instead of negative and possibly costly ones.

A common negative habit is entering a trade by over-leveraging or even over-trading, you win one or two of these gamble trades, and that easily you've began to reinforce a bad habit that is hard to break. These trades never last, and usually one bad trade can wipe out all your winnings.

An example of a positive habit is checking a pip value calculator and working out a safe lot size to use to enter a setup you have. By doing this, you know you're using a position size, which dependant on your stop loss, you're only risking x% of your account. I personally recommend risking 1-2% per trade.

This obviously goes without saying, but you're better off choosing and sticking to positive habits rather than negative ones. Positive habits lead to positive long-term results and overall performance in the trading game.

Crazy enough, I took a trade on CAD/CHF that resulted in a major profit, and then it set up again... You can read the blog post I made about it here.

So very similar to my last trade, I was bullish on the CAD, and liked the idea of jumping in on another pullback. Here's what I sent out to members inside the private group:

So I took the trade... and sure enough the bull rally continued! Shortly after, I was moving my stop to break even.

Once price rallied to the previous high, I started to trail my stop loss. Here's what I sent out to members:

Sure enough, it rallied a bit past this level on fresh CPI news out of the US (which, due to the CHF and CAD's relationships to USD respectively, caused the pair to spike higher). From here, I aggressively moved my stop loss higher, in case there was a spike the opposite way as we often see post news events.

In the end, the trade was a great winner. Closing out at about a 4 to 1 risk to reward. Meaning, for every $100 I risked, I ended up making $400. Not a bad way to start the week!

For full transparency, my trades are NOT always this good. I took a loss shortly after this on AUDUSD, which resulted in a -$550 loss. Here's what I thought would happen! (I ended up getting spiked out of the trade on a stop loss. Frustrating, but part of the game sometimes!)

You win some, you lose some. The main point though is that the big wins can outweigh the losses, and that's all that matters in the end. If you like my trade breakdowns, make sure to join us inside the private group, where I share all of my trades in realtime with analysis like you've seen in this post. Use code READER for a discount! Click here to join our private discord channel

With anything you do in life, setting goals and expectations is crucial. It keeps you on the right track and provides benchmarks to ultimately, obtain the long-term goal; being a wealthy profitable trader.

However, I've come to realise that setting these small benchmarks can actually be quite dangerous. Setting these too high or too unrealistic, we're just setting ourselves up for disappointment and failure from the pressure of achieving it in not enough time.

Usually, as a brand new trader, you quite quickly learn how hard trading is, from the performance aspect, all the way to the psychological aspect, probably the most difficult. Here are 3 trading goals that often lead to disappointment:

1) Learn Quicker By Taking More Trades

Taking more trades and being in the market technically makes you gain more experience, but it doesn't mean you'll learn how to trade properly any quicker than if you took fewer trades.

In fact, this dangerous goal and mindset will lead to overtrading, which we all know is a common pitfall for new traders, leading to failure.

Quality over quantity, you've definitely heard this phrase before, and this same rule applies in trading. Instead of being in 4/5 separate trades, focus on one or two trades, make sure you have many confluences in your trading, learn how to get that perfect entry, and everything else that comes with opening and closing a trade from start to finish.

2) Make $5000 Per Month With My $250 Account

Come on, who are you honestly trying to fool? I get it, after you've seen all these Instagram gurus preach that you can make so much money and you've finally decided to take the leap and open an account, you quickly learn that making $5,000 in a trade from 10 pips, requires a 6-figure account, which almost everyone does not have.

Medical students do not become skilled surgeons overnight. Apprentices do not become mechanics overnight. This same rule applies in trading. You, someone who just found out about trading through a couple of Instagram ads, do not become a pro millionaire trader overnight.

It's pretty absurd that some people genuinely believe that this is obtainable because I can tell you first hands myself, I've lost more than £20,000 before I made my first £1,000.

Like any profession, it takes years of practice and experience to develop the skills needed to turn trading into your primary income source. You're simply setting yourself up for disappointment if you try to fight this statement.

3) Trading Is All About The Money

The profits you make do indeed determine your strategy's effectiveness, but this doesn't necessarily dictate success on a day-to-day basis. Trading is a long-term skill, not something you quickly do to make a bit of extra cash for the day.

Instead of gauging daily success on how much you want to make, focus instead on monthly percentage profit gains. Instead of aiming to achieve $50 per day, strive to achieve +10% per month with a $10,000 account. This way, you can achieve that same target just over a more extended period of time.

Trading isn't just about the money you make, but instead the actual skill behind it. Being able to interpret data about the economy to your advantage and taking "educated guesses" as to the direction of a market. This can be done through technical or fundamental analysis or both.

In an environment that requires a lot of focus and concentration, getting rid of this unnecessary baggage takes a lot of weight off your shoulders and, in the end, becoming a profitable long-term trader.

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