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Shocking CAD Inflation News

Statistics Canada released a surprising new batch of inflation data this morning: month-over-month CPI failed to meet market forecasts, declining by 0.3% instead of the anticipated 0.1%. Rather than being an outlier, the other measurements of CPI mostly followed suit, as both year-over-year Trimmed CPI and Median CPI likewise failed to meet expectations. Trimmed CPI’s poor performance, clocking in at a 5.2% increase year-over-year instead of the expected 5.5%, could be interpreted as particularly significant in that it excludes the 40% most volatile prices. This may theoretically set CAD fundamentals apart from USD, in that the Federal Reserve has incentive to keep hiking interest rates due to stubborn core inflation, while the Bank of Canada no longer does. Regardless of your overall Canadian Dollar bias, this is shocking CAD inflation news.

Best Pairs to Trade

While there are multiple ways to take this news, I personally have two takeaways: 1) USD/CAD bullishness now seems more compelling in light of the growing disparity between Canada’s inflation problem and the US’ inflation problem, and 2) the market reaction to this news could present discounted opportunities to buy CAD against less promising currencies. These readings are consistent with current EdgeFinder signals as well, as can be seen with the following pairs:

1) USD/CAD (Receives a 3, or ‘Buy’ Signal)

Shocking CAD Inflation News
Shocking CAD Inflation News

Price action has just hit a historic resistance zone, with Keltner Channels also indicating overbought conditions. Conservative traders may want to wait for a more optimal buying opportunity, though there may be some breathing room left before hitting the upper trendline and top of this resistance zone.

2) GBP/CAD (Receives a -6, or ‘Strong Sell’ Signal)

Shocking CAD Inflation News
Shocking CAD Inflation News

Price action is currently retesting the depicted zone as resistance and could potentially serve as an optimal selling point.

3) NZD/CAD (Receives a -4, or ‘Sell’ Signal)

Shocking CAD Inflation News
Shocking CAD Inflation News

Despite the bearish CAD news and support at 0.79, price action has still been bearish for this pair today. There is also ample room to potentially continue selling off before touching support from the lower trendline.

2 Paths for Aussie Bears

At 9:30 pm Eastern Time tonight, the Reserve Bank of Australia (RBA) will be publishing their latest round of monetary policy meeting minutes. While there is a chance that their intentions could come across as more hawkish than expected, they currently have little reason to be. Despite relatively low unemployment at 3.5%, steady GDP growth, and annual inflation having increased by a full percentage point to 6.1%, the Australian economy has not overheated in a manner comparable to that of other countries.

Because their inflation threat is not nearly as dire as that faced by the US, the UK, and the EU, the RBA’s 50 bp rate hikes understandably pale in comparison to the Fed and the European Central Bank’s 75 bp hikes, or the Bank of Canada’s willingness to utilize a full 100 bp hike. Because of this disparity in economic circumstances, there is a good chance that the RBA’s meeting minutes will favor AUD bears tonight as a fundamental catalyst. For those who are interested in watching this unfold or perhaps taking a position, here are 2 paths for Aussie bears, along with their respective EdgeFinder ratings and categories.

1) AUD/USD (Receives a -4, or ‘Sell’ Signal)

2 Paths for Aussie Bears
2 Paths for Aussie Bears

With big monetary policy decisions and economic projections coming on Wednesday from a hawkish Federal Reserve, there is a chance that significant bearish momentum could be coming. Institutional traders clearly have far more confidence in USD over AUD, as per COT data.

2) AUD/CHF (Receives a -4, or ‘Sell’ Signal)

2 Paths for Aussie Bears
2 Paths for Aussie Bears

The Swiss National Bank is expected to implement a 75 bp rate hike on Thursday, officially leaving negative interest rates behind. This marks a hawkish pivot that continues to set apart the Swiss Franc as a safe haven currency.

Bonus: AUD/CAD (Receives a -2, or ‘Neutral’ Signal)

2 Paths for Aussie Bears
2 Paths for Aussie Bears

Though perhaps less clear than with the two aforementioned pairs, the Bank of Canada’s approach to contending with inflation contrasts remarkably with the RBA’s, despite both CAD and AUD being commodity currencies. Also, Canada has a monthly round of CPI data due on Tuesday.

4 Pairs to Watch Next Week

As the trading week comes to a close, and forex traders are given another weekend of respite to mentally rest and/or backtest, it is worth considering where to pick back up on Monday. While there are many criteria to consider when selecting pairs to watch closely, in this article we will list several such pairs based on scheduled economic data releases and compelling EdgeFinder analysis. Based on these two categories, here are 4 pairs to watch next week.

1) GBP/CAD (Receives a -7, or ‘Strong Sell’ Signal)

4 Pairs to Watch Next Week
4 Pairs to Watch Next Week

On Tuesday, September 20th, Statistics Canada will be releasing a variety of month-over-month and year over year CPI data for August. On Thursday, September 22nd, the Bank of England (BoE) is forecast to hike the Official Bank Rate by 50 basis points, issuing a corresponding monetary policy summary as well. The Bank of Canada has been far more hawkish as of late than the BoE, so unless there are any bullish surprises, this pair seems likely to continue its bearish trend.

2) GBP/CHF (Receives a -7, or ‘Strong Sell’ Signal)

4 Pairs to Watch Next Week
4 Pairs to Watch Next Week

Along with the aforementioned BoE upcoming monetary policy decision, the Swiss National Bank (SNB) will also be deciding on a new policy rate on Thursday, September 22nd. The SNB is expected to implement a rate hike of 75 basis points, doing away with the precedent of negative interest rates. These expectations have seen this pair fall to historically significant lows, as can be glimpsed on the 1-week timeframe above.

3) GBP/USD (Receives a -6, or ‘Strong Sell’ Signal)

4 Pairs to Watch Next Week
4 Pairs to Watch Next Week

This pair presents another opportunity to sell GBP, since the Federal Reserve will be adjusting the Federal Funds Rate on Wednesday September 21st, as well as issuing accompanying economic projections and a related statement. Fed Chair Jerome Powell currently shows no signs of relenting from hawkishness as a 75 basis point rate hike is forecast. With support being tested, we will see whether the BoE or the Fed could present a catalyst for a breakout to the downside.

4) USD/JPY (Receives a 4, or ‘Buy’ Signal)

4 Pairs to Watch Next Week
4 Pairs to Watch Next Week

Along with the upcoming Federal Reserve decision, the Bank of Japan (BoJ) will also make a monetary policy decision this week. If the BoJ continues to keep their Policy Rate below-zero, further abstaining from rate hikes as currently forecast, this could usher in even more bullish momentum for this pair. Depending on how the Fed’s move meets or contrasts with market expectations, USD/JPY could yet again touch, or break out above, trendline resistance.

How to Short GBP

(More) Bad News for the United Kingdom

This morning, at 2 am Eastern Time, the UK’s Office for National Statistics reported that month-over-month Gross Domestic Product (GDP), a key measure of economic output, had failed to meet forecasts. While markets and analysts had expected 0.3% or 0.4% growth, the reality was a disappointing 0.2%. Though not a contraction, it is yet another in a long list of unfortunate national events ranging from double-digit annual inflation to the death of Queen Elizabeth II.

With newly elected Prime Minister Liz Truss taking the reigns at a time of great economic suffering, and a still-wary Bank of England unable to halt supply-side woes, there is little certainty to be found for the Pound Sterling. With fundamentals, institutional sentiment, and technical analysis pointing towards continued GBP bearish momentum, let’s explore which GBP pairs have the best selling potential.

Top Three Pairs to Sell

According to the EdgeFinder, A1 Trading’s market scanner software, the three most promising pairs to sell are all GBP pairs. All three are experiencing months-long downtrends, with recent bullish price action retesting key levels in the form of resistance. Here they are, along with their respective EdgeFinder signals:

1) GBP/USD (Earns a Score of -7, or ‘Strong Sell’)

How to Short GBP

2) GBP/CHF (Earns a Score of -7, or ‘Strong Sell’)

How to Short GBP

3) GBP/CAD (Earns a Score of -7, or ‘Strong Sell’)

How to Short GBP
3 Ways to Sell JPY

The Japanese Yen has continued to plummet in value in the forex market, recently hitting a low not seen in twenty-four years. It appears as if the Bank of Japan (BoJ) will not budge on monetary policy as negative interest rates continue to be the norm for the foreseeable future, despite vocal concerns from Japan’s government. As the BoJ’s relentless dovishness continues to set it apart from increasingly hawkish central bank contemporaries, many traders resume shorting the Yen. Let's discuss 3 ways to sell JPY.

How Long Can the BoJ Hold Out?

While much of the developed world is focused on frantically quelling high inflation rates through contractionary monetary policy tools like rate hikes and quantitative tightening, Japan is not. Rather, the BoJ is in the unique situation of perpetually trying to stimulate Japan’s economy to prevent deflation and create growth. Considering that the BoJ has been striving for at least 2% annual inflation for years, and has only just hit 2.6%, the likelihood of an immediate rate hike seems slim. This situation makes JPY a relatively safe currency to bet against from the standpoint of fundamentals, since the BoJ has little incentive to become aggressive.

Three Potential Pairs to Trade

According to the EdgeFinder, A1 Trading’s market scanner that offers supplemental analysis, the three following JPY pairs are potentially the most promising to buy for Yen bears. Considering that the host countries of all three base currencies are dealing with severe inflation threats, and have become significantly more hawkish in response, these fundamentals contrast well with JPY’s. Here are the pairs, along with their respective EdgeFinder ratings:

1) USD/JPY (Earns a 4, or ‘Buy’ Rating)

3 Ways to Sell JPY

2) CAD/JPY (Earns a 4, or ‘Buy’ Rating)

3 Ways to Sell JPY

3) EUR/JPY (Earns a 3, or ‘Buy’ Rating)

3 Ways to Sell JPY
3 Great CAD Pairs

Federal Reserve Chair Jerome Powell made a market-moving speech this morning, striking a deliberately hawkish tone regarding the taming of inflation continuing to be the Fed’s priority. While USD is surging against other currencies as markets now expect further interest rate hikes with a greater degree of certainty, let’s explore another currency that may be quite undervalued: the Canadian Dollar. Let’s discuss CAD’s fundamentals, and 3 great CAD pairs to potentially trade next week.

What’s Special About CAD Fundamentals?

Taken at face value, the state of Canada’s economy may not seem especially impressive in terms of fundamental analysis for forex. Annual inflation (7.6%) is high, but not shockingly so relative to other economies, and the unemployment rate hovers just shy of a mediocre 5%. However, upon a closer look, there are many impressive aspects to it, including an extremely hawkish Bank of Canada, a key interest rate identical to that of the US, and positive GDP growth. On top of these conditions, Canada consistently exports oil and gas to the US, an economy approximately ten times bigger, and the estimated value of Canada’s natural resources is over $30 trillion, among the highest in the world.

Best Pairs to Trade

For those who are interested in going long on CAD, here are three of the EdgeFinder’s top-rated suggestions for CAD pairs to sell, along with their respective ratings:

1) GBP/CAD (Earns a -8, or 'Strong Sell')

3 Great CAD Pairs

2) EUR/CAD (Earns a -7, or 'Strong Sell')

3 Great CAD Pairs

3) NZD/CAD (Earns a -3, or 'Sell')

3 Great CAD Pairs
Top 4 Pairs to Sell Today

At 2 am Eastern Time today, the United Kingdom’s Office for National Statistics reported that annual inflation has officially crossed into the double digits for the first time since 1982. In July, year-over-year CPI in the UK beat expectations by rising 10.1%, while year-over-year Core CPI (which excludes volatile food and energy prices) similarly beat market forecasts by increasing 6.2%. While high inflation of this magnitude is typically a bullish indication for a currency, implying rampant growth which must be slowed through higher interest rates, there is reason to believe that is not the case here. This is primarily because a) the UK’s economy is contracting, and b) the Bank of England has thus far been too timid to be effectively hawkish. With this in mind, let’s discuss the EdgeFinder’s top 4 pairs to sell today, which happen to all be GBP pairs.

1) GBP/USD

Top 4 Pairs to Sell Today

This pair makes the top of the bearish list, earning a -8 or ‘strong sell’ signal from the EdgeFinder. This is because the US economy’s fundamentals are better than the UK’s (except for severity in GDP contraction), trader sentiment heavily favors USD, and both trend reading and seasonality (historical performance this month) indicate bearishness.

2) GBP/CHF

Top 4 Pairs to Sell Today

This pair also earns a ‘strong sell’ signal, or -6. Most variables favor CHF due to the Swiss economy’s resilient performance in contrast to that of the UK. COT data and interest rate divergence are the only categories that don’t support this signal because institutional traders have similar sentiment regarding these currencies, and the Swiss National Bank has not had to confront high inflation.

3) GBP/CAD

Top 4 Pairs to Sell Today

Earning yet another -6 or ‘strong sell’ signal, all categories but two favor CAD due to Canada’s economic stability and hawkish central bank. Only seasonality favors GBP, along with the UK’s superior unemployment rate (currently 3.8% to Canada’s 4.9%), though Canada’s has been declining.

4) GBP/AUD

Top 4 Pairs to Sell Today

This pair earns a milder, but still significant, ‘sell’ signal at -5. All listed fundamentals lean in AUD’s favor, while both institutional and retail sentiment remain neutral, with only seasonality supporting GBP.

Why Global Recession Is Still Likely

On Friday this past week, the United Kingdom’s Office for National Statistics released the latest reports on the UK’s Gross Domestic Product (GDP), a means of measuring economic output. It was revealed that their economy grew by -0.6% month-over-month, and -0.1% quarter-over-quarter, which entails a contraction for both timeframes. Although these numbers are less disastrous than had been forecast, they are unfortunately part of a trend: New Zealand has also suffered a contraction in GDP, while the United States has experienced two consecutive quarters of contraction, a technical recession. While these declines in output are historically strange, seemingly contradicting recent phenomena like relatively high levels of employment and stock market rallies, they ought to be taken into account by traders nonetheless. Let’s explore some of the root causes of these contractions as well as factors exacerbating them as we discuss why global recession is still likely.

1) Restricted Supply

Often when inflation occurs, it is because demand for a product or service is rising at a faster rate than the supply of the product or service itself. However, this is not always the case; sometimes, inflation is caused primarily by a decrease in the supply of a thing, rather than growing demand alone. We are experiencing this phenomenon today with high food and energy prices, which explains why CPI has far outpaced core CPI (which excludes volatile food and energy prices) in many countries.

Because commodities like oil and commodity crops are scarce resources that consumers rely on to live, geopolitical problems like the invasion of Ukraine and resulting sanctions, as well as environmental problems such as heatwaves, droughts, and famines, restrict available supply. Many of these problems either are or can become chronic and near-ubiquitous, leading to persistent inflation from shortages that cannot be resolved through contractionary monetary policy.

2) Interest Rate Hikes

While interest rate hikes are a crucial monetary policy tool for curbing inflation and cooling an overheating economy, they also come with a nasty side effect: slower growth. This is because rising interest rate are designed to stifle growth by limiting consumers’ and businesses’ ability and desire to borrow money, restricting spending and thus the chances of inflation.

While lower GDP growth, even a contraction, does not necessarily create a recession, it is nonetheless playing with fire by taking steps in that direction. This is especially relevant considering that many central banks, such as the Federal Reserve and the Bank of Canada, have begun fully embracing hawkishness through unusually aggressive rate hikes.

3) Trade Deficits

Another economic factor that often quite literally detracts from a country’s GDP is trade balance. Some wealthy countries have negative trade balances, or trade deficits, created by their imports exceeding their exports. While a trade deficit might grant consumers more access to lower priced goods from other countries, it also results in a net loss of economic output that is subtracted from GDP. When trade deficits are frequent, as in the case of the US, this can theoretically severely impede economic growth, which likely contributed to the country’s technical recession. Both the UK and New Zealand have recently been reporting trade deficits as well, which is unsurprising.

4) Underfunded Pensions

Across the developed world, underfunded pension programs are proving to be a difficult problem to contend with. With large percentages of many countries’ workforces retiring, public pension systems such as Germany’s are struggling to keep up, with the German government bailing out the program with €100bn in 2021. Likewise, Social Security in the US is expected to be trillions of dollars behind in long-term funding, despite the average annual benefit amounting to less than $20,000 per recipient. Failure to improve pensions severely limits demand and growth within an economy, since a large chunk of many countries’ populations are retired adults who still spend.

5) Real Pay Cuts

Some economists worry about the possibility of high inflation combined with hot labor markets creating a ‘wage-price spiral’ where inflation persists uncontrollably due to rising employee earnings. However, the truth appears to be less fanciful, and grimmer. Even with today’s historically high rates of increasing incomes for working people, year-over-year inflation completely negates these raises in most circumstances. For example, with average hourly earnings increasing over 5% in the US, when we account for 8.5% year-over-year CPI, this implies a real pay cut of approximately 3% for working people. This entails a net loss in consumer spending, which means less revenue for businesses, and thus lower GDP growth.

6) Self-Fulfilling Prophecy

For better or for worse, market sentiment has a hand in creating fundamentals (by allocating capital), not just the other way around. Thus, if dread about a global recession continues to loom in the public consciousness, traders and investors may respond by buying and selling accordingly, potentially accelerating a coming recession with stock market and forex selloffs. In this way, the general perception of an impending global recession alone can play a large role in creating one.

Consequences for Pairs?

Lately, much of traders’ fundamental analysis has focused on how central banks respond to inflation as the primary economic threat. However, if global recession becomes a reality, there is a chance we could see central banks return to their dovish ways, which may warrant reassessing pair biases from scratch. It is also worth noting that these hypothetical dovish pivots may not occur in the face of stagflation, which unfortunately seems possible given supply concerns.

Key Takeaways

• A number of countries are currently experiencing negative GDP growth, i.e., contractions in economic output, which traders should take into account while gauging the likelihood of global recession.
• One aspect of each contraction likely involves the potentially dwindling supply of scarce resources such as crops and oil due to war, sanctions, droughts, and other potentially chronic problems. This lowers the amount of ‘stuff’ there is to buy, shrinking output.
• While interest rate hikes curb inflation within a currency’s host country, they also disincentivize consumers and businesses from borrowing money, restricting GDP growth.
• Economies prone to trade deficits, i.e., spending more on imports than they receive selling exports, impair their GDP growth by net losing output in the trade process.
• Underfunded pension systems, which cause lower benefits for elderly consumers, are proving to be an international problem, limiting consumer demand and GDP accordingly.
• Although wage growth is rising at the fastest rate in years, it still often pales in comparison to high rates of inflation, limiting consumer demand and GDP accordingly.
• Fear of impending recession can become a self-fulfilling prophecy by spooking investors and speculators, encouraging mass selloffs that create the catastrophes they were afraid of in the first place.
• If a massive event such as global recession, or even stagflation, becomes reality, this could warrant a complete reevaluation of pair biases and fundamentals.

How To Short USD: 3 Options

Why Sell USD?

While many USD bulls (including myself) think that bullish momentum in the US Dollar Index has a ways to go before buying pressure is exhausted, there is a compelling argument that this is not the case. First, the United States economy officially met the criteria for a technical recession as of Thursday morning: two consecutive quarters of GDP contraction, which is bearish for USD in theory.

Second, Fed Chair Jerome Powell gave ambiguous comments at the FOMC press conference this past Wednesday, which many analysts and traders interpreted as subtly dovish. If true, this would be monumentally bearish for USD, considering US inflation remains at 40-year highs. For those interested in shorting the US Dollar, here are three major pairs that the EdgeFinder, an A1 Trading tool for supplemental analysis, signals as opportunities for selling USD.

How To Short USD: 3 Options
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1) Sell USD/CHF

With a rating of -6, earning a ‘strong sell’ signal, fundamentals currently favor CHF for the most part, between Switzerland’s 2% unemployment rate and growing economy. The only strike against it is currently COT data, with a higher percentage of institutional traders buying USD rather than CHF.   

How To Short USD: 3 Options
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2) Sell USD/CAD

With a rating of -4, earning a ‘sell’ signal, fundamentals are somewhat mixed for the pair, and are especially unique considering that the US is one of Canada’s primary trading partners. However, retail sentiment, seasonality, and trend reading currently weigh in CAD’s favor.

How To Short USD: 3 Options
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3) Buy NZD/USD

With a rating of 4, earning a ‘buy’ signal, fundamentals currently favor NZD in light of New Zealand’s 3.2% unemployment rate and smaller economic contraction, as well as their exports. While institutional and retail sentiment don’t favor NZD, seasonality and trend reading do.

How To Short USD: 3 Options

How To Monitor USD

For those who are interested in keeping tabs on USD fundamentals and sentiment before trading major pairs, investing in the EdgeFinder will help you keep up with the latest economic data, COT data, and more. Use this link if you would like to purchase the EdgeFinder, or perhaps try it out for free.

Warning: How Doomed Is GBP?

GBPUSD reached a new two-year low today upon falling beneath 1.19 support yet again, the second time since last week. These lows are due in part to USD strength after Friday’s strong Non-Farm Payroll data revealed over 100,000 more new US jobs than were expected; as traders anxiously await Wednesday’s new CPI numbers, anticipation for red-hot US inflation grows. However, much of GBPUSD’s bearish momentum is due to the Pound itself, and unusual, pessimistic circumstances that the UK’s economy is facing. Let’s explore what these conditions are as we issue a warning: how doomed is GBP?

1) Resignations & Other Chaos

On July 7th, a Thursday morning, UK Prime Minister Boris Johnson resigned as leader of the Conservative Party. His stepping down came amid an unexpected mass resignation of over fifty Conservative members of parliament (MPs), due to disappointment in party leadership over a slew of scandals. It is worth noting that while Johnson has resigned as head of his party, he intends to remain Prime Minister over the next few months, until the governing Conservative Party elects a new leader to replace him. These events have aided in throwing Parliament into disarray, and will certainly not improve its economic problem-solving efficacy, nor any sentiment adjacent to it.

While political resignations of this magnitude would be inconvenient for any country to experience, this is especially difficult for the UK, since post-Brexit trade deals are still either in their infancy or have yet to be negotiated. Since 2020, when Brexit took effect and the UK’s trade to GDP ratio declined by 8.31% (from 63.4% to 55.09%), trade statistics have been volatile and tricky to analyze, especially in light of post-COVID supply chain issues. According to the UK’s Office for National Statistics, “It continues to be difficult to assess the extent to which trade movements reflect short-term trade disruption or longer-term supply chain adjustments.”

2) A Reluctant Bank of England

The UK’s annual inflation rate hit a staggering 9.1% in May, the highest among the G7 countries. In theory this should be bullish for GBP, because higher inflation implies a growing economy and serves as an antecedent to rate hikes, which are central bank attempts to stabilize prices. However, despite the Bank of England (BoE), the UK’s central bank, warning that annual inflation could reach 11% in the coming months, they lag significantly behind the US’ Federal Reserve in terms of hawkish aggression. They have thus far only resorted to 25 basis point rate hikes within the past year, with their target interest rate currently at 1.25%; this slow pace is nearly as tepid as tightening monetary policy can be. This hesitancy to stamp out UK hyperinflation is extremely bearish for GBP.

3) A Rising Unemployment Rate

The UK’s unemployment rate recently ticked up to 3.8%. While rising unemployment is a bad sign for the performance of any country’s economy, this is particularly problematic for the UK and the Bank of England for two reasons. First, considering that the BoE’s target interest rate is a relatively low 1.25% while inflation is at 40-year highs, for unemployment to already be increasing is discouraging. This indicates fragility in the UK’s labor market, and by extension their economy, which likely contributes to the BoE being wary of contractionary monetary policy. Second, if the UK labor market continues to be acutely sensitive to a cooling economy, this joblessness might especially aid in slowing consumer spending, reducing the overall need for BoE intervention via rate hikes (unless stagflation surfaces).

4) Bearish Institutional Sentiment

According to recent Commitments of Traders (COT) data, GBP clocks in as the third most shorted COT asset, with 70.75% of all institutional traders selling the Pound. This bearishness is a significant factor in creating GBP selling pressure, since much of forex price action is generated by institutional activity, due to the sheer scale of their purchases and sales.

What Happens Next?

For now, fundamentals for GBP appear rather bleak despite high inflation, and COT data reflects this. However, there is a chance that this hyperinflation in the UK could eventually force the BoE’s hand, prompting them to eventually lean into hawkishness to prevent catastrophic overheating. While this pivot could be around the corner, along with newfound GBP bullish momentum, traders would be wise to not assume this is the case until there are clear signs from the BoE. Unless this happens, GBP seems primed for continued selling.  

Best Pairs to Trade

While GBPUSD has received a ‘strong sell’ signal from the EdgeFinder, an A1 Trading tool for supplemental trading analysis, there are many other GBP pairs potentially worth trading too. Such pairs include GBPCAD, which likewise receives a ‘strong sell’ signal, as well as GBPAUD and GBPNZD, which both receive ‘sell’ signals. Along with GBPUSD, these four pairs all rank in the EdgeFinder’s top eight pairs worth selling.

Key Takeaways

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